Essay On Frederick Douglass Life

Essay On Frederick Douglass Life-6
As he gained more knowledge of the world at large, he could no longer passively submit to a life of slavery.In September 1838, he borrowed the identification papers of a free black sailor and boarded a train for the North.Those who profess to favor freedom, and deprecate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground, they want rain without thunder and lightning." Because he was willing to dedicate his life to struggle and agitate for the abolition of slavery, and then the cause of civil rights, Douglass remains at the forefront of the American consciousness.

As he gained more knowledge of the world at large, he could no longer passively submit to a life of slavery.In September 1838, he borrowed the identification papers of a free black sailor and boarded a train for the North.Those who profess to favor freedom, and deprecate agitation, are men who want crops without plowing up the ground, they want rain without thunder and lightning." Because he was willing to dedicate his life to struggle and agitate for the abolition of slavery, and then the cause of civil rights, Douglass remains at the forefront of the American consciousness.

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas has quoted Douglass in his rulings on several education cases.

Modern Americans are constantly reminded about the importance of Douglass's life and accomplishments.

Following the war, hoping that equality would be achieved with the end of slavery, he moved his family to Washington, D. resident minister and consul general (ambassador) to Haiti.

C., where he was appointed president of the Freedman's Savings Bank. Hayes appointed him federal marshal for the District of Columbia, and in that capacity he stood beside James Garfield as he took the presidential oath of office in 1881. Ending his life at Cedar Hill, his twenty-one room District of Columbia home, in February 1895, Frederick Douglass had come about as far as humanly possible from his beginnings in a Maryland slave cabin.

As he grew old enough to work he passed through a series of masters, some kind and some cruel.

Despite his situation, Frederick managed to learn to read and write, sometimes by bribing white boys into teaching him in exchange for bits of bread.Many sites in the United States pay homage to the civil rights activist through adopting his name.At least twenty-four schools and academies are named for Douglass, and parks and buildings from New York to Louisiana bear his name. The famous "history painter" Jacob Lawrence painted a series of thirty-two canvases dedicated to the life and memory of Douglass.In the first of three autobiographies, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, published in 1845, he recounts the adversity of his early life.He rarely saw his mother who worked as a field hand, had barely enough clothes to cover his body, and had to eat from a trough like a farmyard animal.The great civil rights activist Frederick Douglass was born into slavery on a Maryland Eastern Shore plantation in February 1818.His given name, Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, seemed to portend an unusual life for this son of a field hand and a white man, most likely Douglass's first master, Captain Aaron Anthony.The social distance Douglass traveled during his lifetime continues to inspire modern Americans to take a lesson from his life.If he could achieve so much after his most humble of beginnings, perhaps our own dreams and goals are within reach.Places as diverse as Harlem, Detroit, and Oklahoma City have Frederick Douglass streets or avenues. To ensure that his words remain accessible, Yale University Press and a series of historical editors are producing modern editions of Douglass's autobiographies as well as his correspondence and speeches.His life has been dramatized in the fiction of such authors as Miriam Grace Monfredo and Jewell Parker Rhodes, and celebrated in the poetry of Paul Laurence Dunbar and Robert Hayden. The Library of Congress has digitized its entire collection of Douglass's papers and made them available at its American Memory website.

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